16/07/2013

EDF Energy Renewables has confirmed that it is to appeal against a recent council decision to refuse planning permission for a proposed wind farm development near Sturton le Steeple, Nottinghamshire.

In February, Bassetlaw District Council’s planning committee turned down EDF Energy Renewables’ application for a nine turbine wind farm on agricultural land at Maumhill, to the west of Sturton Le Steeple and south of West Burton power station.

The refusal decision was taken largely on the basis of impact on landscape character.

A spokesperson for EDF Energy Renewables said: “After due consideration and a review of the Council’s decision to turn down planning permission of the Maumhill scheme, we have decided to lodge an appeal with the Government’s Planning Inspectorate.

“We take the utmost care with our site selection for all our projects and considered a wide range of issues before proceeding with this application.

“We continue to believe the Maumhill site is an excellent location for the size of wind farm proposed and provides a good opportunity for the generation of low carbon electricity which will help meet government renewable energy targets and the country’s future energy supply needs.”

Bassetlaw District Council planning policy is supportive of renewable energy projects, subject to certain criteria regarding environmental impact. The proposed site is also recognised and located within a potential area identified for large-scale wind farms as part of this policy.

Ahead of making the original planning application, EDF Energy Renewables revised its original proposal for the scheme after carrying out consultation with local residents.

The revisions included the removal of one turbine originally proposed, reductions to turbine height and adjustments in location to increase the distance from local villages to over 1.2km.

In these circumstances EDF Energy Renewables believes that any landscape impacts would be acceptable for a wind farm development of the scale proposed.

The proposed 18MW wind farm would provide enough power to supply the average annual electricity demands of around 10,000 homes*.

* Please note these figures are based on onshore turbines operating at 26.35% capacity (2006-2011 average capacity factor for onshore wind from Digest of UK Energy Statistics) and assuming 4,266 is the average UK household electricity consumption in kW hours (based on DECCs publication URN:12D/468)